It all starts with parallelism.


The ideal we want to get in corrugating are  flat sheets, no delamination, no wash-boarding and no honeycomb.

To obtain above one has to have a corrugator which is in a perfect state. And this has nothing to do with the age of a corrugator but all to do with maintenance.

People spend millions on a 2.8 or 3.3 meter corrugator, but seem to have no money left to spend on some simple and basic tools to maintain the state of their equipment. For instance, when I’m visiting corrugating plants, I often need to improvise to be able to make an iodine image. I some cases I even have to bring or buy my own iodine. A simple setup can make a big difference and allow you to save multiple thousands of Euros a month. Other affordable but indispensable tools around a corrugator are: a wet film glue metering gauche, and infrared thermometer, a device to measure absolute humidity, a tachometer, a digital microscope, etc.

In this article, and probably many times in the future, i will repeat the importance parallelism. With ‘parallelism’ I refer to both mechanical parallelism (such as reelstand splicers, incoming rollers, glue machine preheaters, etc.), thermal and glue application evenness.

Today there is the tendency to run lower board grammages compared to the past and in addition we run them on wider corrugators. This may lead to creases while unwinding.

Sometimes these creases can be invoked from the paper, either the creases are already in the reels, or the humidity and thickness profiles may cause the crease happening while unwiding. Do not forget that a mechanical chock on a reel, which makes the reel dancing (bouncing), can also be the cause of irregular tension resulting in.

thickness profile paper humidity profile paperGood profile (left: thickness, right: humidity)

A mill expert will be able to tell you based on the profiles if the paper is causing the creases. This can always be the case of course, but in most mills the paper has been wound and often been rewound, so the operators would have noticed if some PROFILES were bad. Winding and rewinding speeds in the mills are at least three times faster than on a corrugator….. the webs are also wider than on the corrugator.

Imagine you are the liner of the singlefaced C  that will end up as BC double wall board. At the start you will be unwound on the UNWINDING STAND that is furthest away of the take-off. Already here you have the option to be unwound on TWO DIFFERENT UNWINDERS.  PLENTY OF ROLLERS will guide towards the singlefacer. Some will be FORMED SPECIALLY to avoid wrinkles or creases (banana reels). You get PREHEATED a couple of time and then you MEET the C flute. Depending on the type of singlefacer you will be PRESSED to the C flute and in between there will be starch applied through the singlefacer GLUEMACHINE. Then you are pulled upstairs on the bridge and they fanfold you. Then you are put on the bridge after being fanfolded, awaiting the next stage in the process.

In the imaginary story above I placed the words in CAPITAL of the areas where parallelism is important.

I think we all agree that if you have two different UNWINDERS (let’s call them unwinder 1 and 2),   there should be no difference between the two. In reality I often see lots of difference. And when i say ‘lots’ then I refer to the fact that I see three corrugators a week by average and this for about 40 weeks (for a period of about 9 years now).  One corrugator a day keeps the doctor away 🙂

If you place your hand on a singlefacer, you will feel the vibration. This vibration is going on every second the machine is running and in the long run there is a risk that parts reposition and mess up parallelism.

The same thing happens to your equipment as to the glass of wine in the video. Centerlining or checking parallelism should be done every second year especially if you are running low grammages.

Other causes to destroy parallelism may be small accidents. For instance if one hits a reelstand with a reel truck or so. Things like this happen more often than they are revealed.

One easy trick if you have issues unwinding is to first unwind the reel on stand 1,  check where the creases are happening (OS or DS),  change the reel to stand 2 and check again.  When you change the reel to stand 2, make sure to follow the unwinding logic.  If the creases disappear it could be that there is something wrong with unwinder 1. If the creases remain in the same relative position toward the reel, then the chance that there is something wrong with the profile of the reel is big. If the creases are still there but at the same side, like when the reel was on reel unwinder 1, then most probably you need to look a bit further in the process to find the cause of the problem.

In this article I concentrated on the singlefacer and reel stands, but parallelism is important in many other area’s which I will discuss in future blogs.

It’s time for my sauna now.

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